G Whiz

I’ve been pretty fortunate to have had lovers to whom orgasm came relatively easily. While I’d like to believe that it’s due to my own skill and attentive nature, the fact is that for reasons not completely understood, a large number of women do not have orgasms during intercourse, and many can barely orgasm from masturbation. Back in the 70s and 80s, barely a month passed without the women’s magazines promoting G-spot stimulation in order to facilitate sexual satisfaction. Men were encouraged to poke around with their fingers to find the Grafenberg spot, a small area that was presumed to carry a bundle of nerve endings and located about two or three inches in on the upper wall of the vagina. Personally, I’ve had a great time over the years exploring the area, and I hope that my partners have enjoyed my explorations.

That’s why I was surprised to see this article in the UK Times Online news:

What an anti-climax: G-spot is a myth

A sexual quest that has for years baffled millions of women — and men — may have been in vain. A study by British scientists has found that the mysterious G-spot, the sexual pleasure zone said to be possessed by some women but denied to others, may not exist at all.

First of all, the G-spot has been somewhat controversial, both as to the location, and to agreement of it’s actual existence. This was probably the largest single study on it since it was “discovered” in the 1950s.

In the research, 1,804 British women aged 23-83 answered questionnaires. All were pairs of identical or non-identical twins. Identical twins share all their genes, while non-identical pairs share 50% of theirs. If one identical twin reported having a G-spot, this would make it far more likely that her sister would give the same answer. But no such pattern emerged, suggesting the G-spot is a matter of the woman’s subjective opinion.

While 56% of women overall claimed to have a G-spot, they tended to be younger and more sexually active. Identical twins were no more likely to share the characteristic than non-identical twins.

This point seems to give credence to those who have claimed that the G-spot was more of a mental state, than a physical entity.

The quest for the G-spot will not be abandoned. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, which is publishing Burri’s and Spector’s work this week, is planning a debate, with publication of research from the pro and anti G-spot camps.

I continue to offer my services toward this worthy study…

Meanwhile, David Matlock, a Beverly Hills cosmetic surgeon, is credited with creating an artificial version of the G-spot. In some cases this has resulted in an over-sensitive zone which induces orgasms when, for example, women drive over bumps in the road.

And this last paragraph mentions something about which I had no idea. An artificial G-spot? Really?

About Tom Allen

The Grey Geezer Dauntless defender of, um, something that needed dauntless defending. Dammit, I can't read this script without my glasses. Hey, you kids, get off my damn lawn!
This entry was posted in Masturbation, sex, sexuality. Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to G Whiz

  1. Now there’s a strong argument against improving the roads around my neighbourhood!

  2. Sulpicia says:

    I don’t know about the G-spot… I just know I have MANY spots, including one located exactly where they say there may or may not be a G-spot. Who cares? I’m loving it.

  3. Elizavetta says:

    Oh, the G spot is there alright. It just travels around. The G actually stands for “gypsy,” dontcha know. (a fact which seems to be weirdly connected, artificially or not, with driving over bumps in the road…)

  4. nursemyra says:

    Where can I get me a road bump-activated spot?

  5. Oh my. As one of the commenters at the article said, the results are somewhat dubious considering that the non-existence of the G spot was what they were looking to find. The objections raised by Beverly Whipple sound right to me too. And although I do have an excellent imagination, I don’t think it runs to feeling things in one part of my body as opposed to another just because someone suggested it would be so. And the cries of ‘Yes, there. Yes, there.’?

  6. sulkygirl says:

    My G Spot.. is actually a faucet [americanising so you can understand what I am saying], I have realised in the last few weeks..

    I agree with S.E. [above].. what a dubious study?!
    The identical physical attributes of twins does not extend to them having the same sexual experiences or the same sexual self awareness.

    Locating the G Spot [and other spots] takes a bit of time.. [unless, Tom you were the ‘control study partner’ – you seem to have it sussed.. and maybe if you could conduct all of the studies on your FRONT PORCH.. sorry – this comment has digressed into something completely else]..
    xx

  7. Maybe it’s position is varied amongst different folk. It’s not as if we all have everything else in exactly the same place as eachother, is it? This post has really got me thinking – people’s knowledge or lack thereof of bodies in general and their own in particular, research methods and motives, the malleable nature of statistics, the pitfalls of using twins for research studies. . .

  8. Wendy Wicke says:

    British scientists? They weren’t from East Anglia University, were they?

    If they’re having trouble finding a G-spot, I’d offer to send my hubs over to help, but I kinda am using him right now.

    And I’m with Nursemyra, where do I get that bump-activated spot?

  9. Becker says:

    Tom the artificial G-spot to which they refer is a cosmetic procedure where they pad-out the wall of the vagina in 1 spot to artificially make it more responsive or more correctly so the person ‘feels’ more sensation through that spot due to the fact it now sits further out and receives more pressure whether digitally or during intercourse.

  10. Bean says:

    Next they’ll be saying menstrual pain is all in women’s heads.

    …Oh, wait.

  11. Fusion says:

    If I read this to my GF she’d laugh, we both know exactly where hers is. But I’m sure every woman is different, in sensitivity, and size/location of her spot. I agree with SE as well, scientists can manipulate data and findings to reach any conclusion they want, given enough time and resources.

  12. Wendy says:

    “Next they’ll be saying menstrual pain is all in women’s heads.

    …Oh, wait.”

    When I had my first baby, the ditz teaching the childbirth class tried to tell us labor pain was all in our heads. She was supposed to be the expert too. Looking back, I think the only thing she told us in that class that was any help at all was where to park the car. Luckily the doctors and nurses were a lot better at their jobs.

    And just for the record, labor does hurt. In case anyone wasn’t sure.

  13. Sulpicia says:

    Ha. Had to add to this. My OB massaged my C-spot whilst I laboured. There were a few pain free moments!

  14. ptathuk says:

    My understanding was that the G-Spot was made sensitive when arousal sent a good blood flow to the area, almost like us guys need our blood flow to perform. No arousal, no sensitivity, as the nurve cluster was well buried. Hit or myth?

    Thinking about all this, just as we guys suffer from disfunction, those ladies that find it hard to orgasm may need something to think about during the act. – A kind of distraction that keeps their mind off of the performing pressure issue, or whatever is stopping them have their fun. Was this ‘something to think about’ the G-spot?

    With all this good advice pouring in, it’s a wonder anyone can find time to have the fun. Oh well, I guess it takes practice. – Lots of practice.

    Keep up (err) the good work, Tom

    ptathuk

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