Where Is The 50Shades Of Femdom? – O Miss Pearl

Where Is The 50Shades Of Femdom? – O Miss Pearl.

Possibly the cleverest take on the absence of the Femdom trope in modern romance literature that I’ve ever read.

About Tom Allen

The Grey Geezer Dauntless defender of, um, something that needed dauntless defending. Dammit, I can't read this script without my glasses. Hey, you kids, get off my damn lawn!
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2 Responses to Where Is The 50Shades Of Femdom? – O Miss Pearl

  1. James says:

    I would note as a male editor for an erotic Romance publisher that while the majority of the readers, writers, and staff of the company are women, men also do all these things. (Until recently the senior editor was male.)

    To the matter of such fiction reaching the mainstream there is the problem of society’s views on BDSM – for some reason if you were to reverse the roles of Anastasia Steele and Christian Grey in Fifty Shades, it would be viewed far more as porn and far less as kinky Romance. Society’s perceptions of gender-roles in sex play a huge part of what will sell as a Romance novel.

    Romance novel publishers are like every other publisher: they are in it for the money. If there is money in such a book, then they’ll sell it. Whilst part of the problem might be a dearth of such stories, profit$ are the defining factor of whether a book gets published.

    In my entirely unscientific survey of the company’s writers, almost all “appear” to be female (that is, they write under feminine names), but a significant minority are male. It has several different books of females who start out weak but become the stronger character, or that start that way (including a couple I have edited, one of which is even on our town library shelves).

    Perhaps I should tackle such a story: I already have an advantage in getting a book published (if it is well-written). The hardest part is not writing a book, but knowing how the publishing industry works and who does what and why.

    • Angelique says:

      I’m also in the writing industry, and James is absolutely correct. If the publishers don’t think the book will make money, it will never see the light of day. The fact is that a large percentage of fiction novels never even earn back the amount paid to the writer in advances.

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